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Culture Clashes: How COVID-19 Heightened Awareness of Treating Vulnerable Populations

From a distrust of authorities to language and cultural barriers, the COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare some uncomfortable facts about treating some of the most vulnerable populations. Caregivers and healthcare professionals need to be acutely aware of how to deal with these patients by overcoming several obstacles from language barriers to accepted cultural norms. Last...
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Carefully Considering Sex and Gender Differences Leads to More Rigorous, Relevant Research

Investigators should carefully consider sex and gender differences when conducting research, according to the authors of a paper recently published in Endocrine Reviews. The review, by Janet W. Rich-Edwards, PhD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, et al, makes the case that sex- and gender-informed perspective “increases rigor, promotes discovery, and expands the relevance...
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Researchers Compare Health Status, Rates of Cardiometabolic Disease Between Transgender Adults and Cisgender Adults

Significant differences in health status and cardiometabolic health exist between transgender adults and cisgender adults in the United States, according to a study recently published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society. Researchers led by Natalie J. Nokoff, MD, of the University of Colorado Denver Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, point out that 0.5 percent...
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Researchers Observe Genotype that Increases Odds of Alzheimer’s, Dementia in African Americans

Researchers may have discovered a factor that contributes to racial discrepancies in developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or dementia, according to a study recently published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Researchers led by Antonio C. Bianco, MD, PhD, of University of Chicago, point out that a common single nucleotide polymorphism in DIO2, Thr92AlaD2, is...
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Are Asians More Likely to Develop Diabetes?

What one doctor noticed a decade ago has been supported by an ever-increasing amount of scientific research: Asians are disproportionately likely to develop diabetes, reports the Los Angeles Times. Ronesha Sinha, MD, a physician in Redwood City, Calif., noticed that his Asian patient population — largely Silicon Valley techies — who were not only slender...