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Researchers Show Link Between Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Health Problems

Researchers in South Africa have shown that regularly drinking sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) contributes to the development of diabetes, high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome, and other endemic health problems, according to a review recently published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society. The review’s authors, led by M. Faadiel Essop, PhD, of Stellenbosch University in Stellenbosch,...
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High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy Linked to Increased Risk of Offspring Obesity

When expectant mothers have elevated blood pressure during pregnancy, it may raise their children’s risk of developing childhood obesity, according to a study recently published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. “Our study is the first to demonstrate that among pregnant women, elevated blood pressure is associated with a greater risk of overweight...
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Endocrine-Disrupting Chemical Tributyltin Alters Stem Cell Adipose Lineage

In yet another indictment of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, researchers have found a mechanism through which tributyltin (TBT) causes obesity and alters adipose lineage, according to an article recently published in Endocrinology. The researchers, led by Bruce Blumberg, PhD, of the University of California, Irvine, point out that nearly 40 percent of American adults are now obese,...
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Researchers Report on How Obesity Promotes Breast Cancer

RiosGarciaHMGU_Spheroid Obesity leads to the release of cytokines into the bloodstream which impact the metabolism of breast cancer cells, making them more aggressive as a result. Scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München, Technische Universität München (TUM), and Heidelberg University Hospital report on this in Cell Metabolism. The team has already been able to halt this mechanism with...
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Balancing Act: Fatty Acids and Our Food Supply

EN1017_cover2 As the diabetes and obesity epidemics continue to flourish, a closer look at our food supply is needed. A new study suggests that getting the right amounts of fatty acids – especially omega-6 and omega-3 – back into our diets is the first vital step.  Last year, the British Medical Journal online journal Open Heart...