Society Update

Vitamin D Story Wins Society Journalism Award

The winner of The Endocrine Society’s 2012 Award for Excellence in Science and Medical Journalism is biomedical writer Nathan Seppa for his article in Science News magazine, “The Power of D.” Society President Janet Hall presented the award to Seppa at ENDO 2012.

The benefits of vitamin D from the sun for healthy bones are well known, and recently researchers are discovering that vitamin D might also be advantageous against other conditions such as cancer, hypertension, and diabetes. Yet these new findings face the same opposition that connecting smoking to cancer once did—the lack of evidence from randomized controlled trials. As such, scientists and doctors are at odds on the daily doses to recommend to their patients. Seppa’s article chronicles the latest studies in the vitamin D field and the discord between the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine and those of The Endocrine Society. The winning article appeared in the July 16, 2011, issue of Science News, and is available at www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/d/332009/title/The_power_of_D_.

This annual award includes travel and hotel expenses to ENDO and a plaque. Established in 2008, it recognizes outstanding reporting that enhances public understanding of health issues pertaining to endocrinology. It is also intended to promote greater Society visibility among medical and science writers and to foster media relationships.

Find out more information about the award at www.endo-society.org/ media/Journalism-Award Requirements.cfm.

Healthy Cooking Demo Is Now Online

If you missed The Hormone Health Network’s three-day program series at ENDO 2012, visit www. hormone.org for a virtual tour of Cooking for Pleasure, Healthy for Life. The Web site features videos of patient panel discussions, moderated by Hormone Health Network Chair Bradley D. Anawalt, and live cooking demonstrations by awarding-winning chefs Amy Riolo and Norene Gilletz. View and download free patient education resources from the event, including therapeutic area-focused recipe booklets, diet tip recommendations, and a portion placemat.

2012 Trainee Awards Winners

This year The Endocrine Society provided over $500,000 in funding to support more than 450 award winners. The wide range of awards recognizes young endocrinologists who have demonstrated exceptional accomplishments in endocrinology. Many awards supported travel to ENDO 2012, allowing young scientists to present their research at the meeting. Additional awards will support research training and fellowships for the next generation of leaders in endocrinology.

Check out the Society’s Awards & Grants Web page to access the complete list of the 2012 trainee award winners, www.endo-society.org/ awards/index.cfm, and get a jump on preparing yourself for the 2013 awards season.

Society Honored For Online Programs

Two of The Endocrine Society’s online educational programs were winners of the 14th Annual Web Health Awards announced in May. The iPhone app Diagnosis and Treatment of Male Hypogonadism won a silver award in the category of Mobile Application: Medical Education/ Small Mobile Device. The Society’s online resource for primary care physicians, Betacellsindiabetes.org also won a bronze award in the category of Web-Based Research/Tool.

The goal of the Web Health Awards is to recognize high-quality electronic health information. The awards program is organized by the Health Information Resource Center (HIRC), a national clearinghouse for professionals who work in consumer health fields. A panel of judges selected winners from 542 entries this year.

Hormone Health Network Launches Menopause Web Site

A new Web site is designed to help the thousands of menopausal women suffering hot flushes, night sweats, mood swings, and other symptoms. With all the confusion surrounding hormone therapy, women often suffer in silence rather than discuss other options with their doctors. To help clarify some of the problems and remedies associated with menopause, the Hormone Health Network recently released the “Menopause Map,” a Web-based tool to facilitate the conversation between women and their doctors about the choices available to them when they reach menopause. Patients can go online to www.hormone.org/ MenopauseMap and answer a series of questions about their personal health history and menopausal symptoms. The tool will then calculate their personal risks of developing breast cancer and heart disease should they decide to undergo hormone or nonhormonal therapy. Additionally, the Web site provides a list of focused questions that women can raise with their doctors.

An accompanying survey conducted by the Hormone Health Network of 810 women age 45–60 years reveals that 7 out of 10 women suffering from menopausal symptoms are not treated. Other findings show that nearly half of all women have a negative impression of hormone therapy. More Caucasian women than African American and Latinas talked to their health care provider about hormone therapy, non-hormonal options, or lifestyle changes.

The Web site is also available in Spanish.

Update Your Member Profile

Guarantee that you receive the latest news about opportunities to present research, new Clinical Practice Guidelines, new Scientific Statements, and more, when you update your member profile online.

Go to www.Endo-Society.org/Profile and login with your Member ID and password. Review the information we have on file for you and make changes where necessary.

If you have any questions, please contact Society Services at SocietyServices@endo-society.org or via phone at +1-301-941-0210 (toll-free in the U.S. at 1-888-363-6762), MondayFriday, 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. ET.

Building a Better ENDO

The Endocrine Society is already planning ENDO 2013. If you have any suggestions for sessions that you’d like included or ways
to improve the conference, please submit these at www.call4abstracts. com/endo_suggest. Your ideas make a difference. For instance, in 2009, the landmark forum on the emerging field of endocrine-disrupting chemicals that brought together regulators, policy makers, and researchers, and placed the Society in the forefront of this field, came about from a member’s suggestion.

Legacy Archives at Your Fingertips

The Endocrine Legacy archive is a compilation of nearly a century of developments and groundbreaking achievements in endocrinology and is free to all Society members. The online source includes past issues of our four seminal Society journals from 1917–1996: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Molecular Endocrinology, Endocrinology, and Endocrine Reviews.

For more information on this essential member benefit, visit www.endo-society.org/legacy.

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