A New Era Begins at the Endocrine Society’s Flagship Basic Science Journal

Hammer_2020

In a year of ongoing unprecedented worldwide challenges, we head into the autumn with hopes and plans for better times ahead. In that spirit, I want to comment on the ongoing success, resilience, and future of our journals, available in almost 8,000 libraries around the world as well as numerous non-profit research institutions in over 100 developing countries. In particular, I want to give you a closer look into our flagship basic science publication, Endocrinology, as it undergoes a changing of the guard at the editor-in-chief position.

The Society thanks Teresa K. Woodruff, PhD, for her service as editor-in-chief these last few years, through June 2020. The energy, vision, and high standards that Teresa and her team brought to Endocrinology helped continue its long run as a global leader in hormone science and research, with more than 43,000 citations and 1.9 million article downloads each year.

We welcome Carol A. Lange, PhD, as the new editor-in-chief, who began receiving new submissions in July 2020. Carol is professor in the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology at the University of Minnesota Masonic Cancer Center, and a 2020 Endocrine Society Laureate Award recipient for her distinguished service to the Society and the field of endocrinology, including her previous role as the editor-in-chief of Hormones & Cancer in 2011 when that journal was with the Society.

Endocrinology encourages the submission of cross-disciplinary and integrative research in traditionally recognized fields of endocrinology as well as molecular studies in emerging areas not traditionally recognized as endocrinology.

The vision for Endocrinology that Carol and her team bring to the journal reflects the Society’s renewed dedication to its basic science community. We are moving ahead on the recommendations of the Society’s Basic Science Advisory Group, which called for Endocrinology to re-double its focus on publishing the very best basic science research, especially in topic areas that were most often targeted for Molecular Endocrinology before that journal merged with Endocrinology in November 2016.

Carol welcomes the submission of original research investigating endocrine function in health and disease at all levels of biological organization, including molecular mechanistic studies of hormone-receptor interactions and hormone-regulated signaling events. Endocrinology encourages the submission of cross-disciplinary and integrative research in traditionally recognized fields of endocrinology as well as molecular studies in emerging areas not traditionally recognized as endocrinology, including mechanisms of signal transduction, the biochemistry and structural biology of receptors or other signaling molecules, epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation and transcription, mitochondrial biochemistry, bioenergetics, cellular metabolism, and stem cell biology/tissue regeneration.​

With continuous online-only publication and monthly issues, the first eight pages free for members, no color charges, and article-level Open Access options, Endocrinology accepts format-neutral manuscript submissions and pre-submission inquiries.

I am also delighted that under Carol’s leadership, Endocrinology is not only continuing the Early Career Reviewers program that Teresa initiated to mentor reviewer/author skills, but is looking into coordinating that program with the Society’s highly-successful FLARE program (Future Leaders Advancing Research in Endocrinology) for trainees and junior faculty from underrepresented minority communities.

In closing, I can do no better in encouraging Society members to read and submit their best research to the journal than to quote Carol as she comes on board to lead Endocrinology. Carol writes:

“I have dedicated my entire career to understanding the biochemistry and the molecular and cell biology of hormone action, and I look forward to continuing Endocrinology’s commitment to publishing the best and most fascinating original research and molecular mechanistic studies on endocrine pathways, cells, systems, and diseases.

“One of the things that drives me is the desire to positively impact the field of endocrinology and promote the success of others within my circle of influence, both as individuals (authors and readers) and at the level of the Society. As a veteran scientist and member, much of my leadership experience has come from service to the Society. As such, I understand the unique strength and core identity of the Society and I enjoy promoting and supporting a stimulating and rich professional environment that recognizes that everyone has something valuable to contribute and is culturally inclusive, diverse, and innovative.

The vision for Endocrinology that Carol and her team bring to the journal reflects the Society’s renewed dedication to its basic science community.

“My charge is to strengthen our basic science base and help integrate this effort with the Endocrine Society annual meeting programming by collaboration with Endocrine Society leadership across the science and educational missions.”

If you have any questions or comments, you can reach me at [email protected]

Gary D. Hammer, MD, PhD
President, Endocrine Society

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