Endocrine Society Lauds Novo Nordisk’s Commitment to Affordable Insulin

The Endocrine Society applauded Novo Nordisk’s recent partnership with CVS Caremark on its new program Reduced RX a prescription savings program that offers discounts on certain medications. Through the partnership, which goes into effect today, patients facing high out-of-pocket costs for insulin will be able to purchase human insulin, Novolin®, for $25 per 10 mL vial, a potential savings of $100 for cash-paying patients.

Since people with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce their own insulin, they need insulin treatment to maintain their glucose control.  People with the more common type 2 diabetes do not produce enough insulin or their bodies cannot use it efficiently. These individuals may need insulin treatment as well. Many people with diabetes depend on insulin, yet increasing prices create a dangerous barrier to access this critical therapy.

The Society is encouraged by Novo Nordisk’s efforts to increase affordable access to this life-saving therapy and will continue to strongly advocate for people with diabetes who depend on insulin to treat their condition.

The Society believes that with greater transparency across the insulin supply chain, stakeholders can work together to make drug pricing more predictable, reduce out-of-pocket costs, and help patients and providers maintain access to affordable, patient-centered therapies.

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