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Making the Grade: Should You Get Certified in Obesity Medicine?

shutterstock_180134717 As trends go, obesity continues its climb to epidemic levels. Likewise, over the last five years the number of physicians certified in obesity medicine has increased tenfold. For clinicians who treat obese patients, getting certified in this specialty is a viable option.   As the obesity epidemic — and the need for evidence-based responses —...
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Can Childhood Obesity be Prevented Before Conception?

First-ever exercise, nutrition program will seek answers by focusing on Cleveland mothers A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and MetroHealth System researcher, along with Cleveland Clinic’s director of metabolic research, have received federal funding to determine if childhood obesity can be prevented before women become pregnant. The first-ever Cleveland-based study will explore whether...
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Eschewing the Fat: New Obesity Treatments Offer New Choices

shutterstock_193294019-rev (1) From a stomach-emptying device to gastric balloons to reformulated drugs, weight-loss options continue to multiply. But are they the wave of the future or a temporary solution to a chronic problem? As the challenge of treating obesity continues to grow, so do the treatment options. Over the past two years, physical interventions that are less...
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Five-Year Results of STAMPEDE Trial Show Bariatric Surgery’s Efficacy on Treating T2D

Researchers at Cleveland Clinic last month published the five-year results of STAMPEDE, a groundbreaking trial that compared intensive medical treatment and surgical treatment of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2D). The results, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, showed that bariatric surgery plus intensive medical intervention was more effective in treating T2D than intensive...
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Metabolic Risk Increased in Obese People Who “Self-Stigmatize”

Obese individuals who “self-stigmatize” about their weight may be at higher risk for developing metabolic problems, according to a study recently published in Obesity. Researchers led by Rebecca L. Pearl, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, write that obese people are often seen as lazy and unattractive, and to blame for their excess...